Selections: Knowledge Graphs

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Knowledge graphs are a visualisation of structured data to show the relationships between those data points. By using knowledge graphs, organisations can see how different data points are related to one another and quickly and accurately pull out their own insights.

Knowledge graphs have been used for some time by Google to help with search results. Although Google does not publicly share how their knowledge graph is implemented, it uses public information, such as Wikipedia, to relate different facts while enriching it with individuals searches. If you’d like to see Google’s knowledge graph in action, search for a historic figure, the information on the sidebar including the “people also search for” section is an example of this.

For a quick view of how a knowledge graph can look, EntiTree is a free tool that pulls data from Wikipedia to show the relationships between different articles. For example, you can see different relationships Coca-Cola has based on information from Wikipedia.

It is easiest to think of knowledge graphs as a way to discovering facts and relationships between different entities. This means that knowledge graphs can be used by many different organisations and in many different ways. A relatively straightforward use case for knowledge graphs could be for graphing out a client network.

If an organisation wanted to see the relationships between all their clients, they could integrate a knowledge graph into their CRM. The knowledge graph software then automatically pulls out the data, enriching it with more publically available information, and showcasing the relationships between current customers. The software could go further by using public data to show the relationships between the organisation’s current customers and the leads they have in their CRM.

Beyond that, knowledge graphs have a variety of use cases such as supply chain management, event forecasting, machine learning, explainable AI, customer experience, and much more. In essence, knowledge graphs serve as a way for organisations to easily visualise data, identify relationships, manage processes, and gain insights.

Below is a short list of companies that are helping large enterprise unlock the potential of the knowledge graph.


2017 founded, $3.0m raised, 25 – 50 employees, US-based

Client snapshot:

Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation, Goodwill, US Chamber of Commerce

What do they do?

Brighthive creates a networking platform intended to increase business value and collective impact through data collaboration. The company’s platform streamlines the business, legal, technical and governance workflows for cross-enterprise data collaborations, automates the process for members to connect, standardize, securely share and create new combined data resources, supporting the creation and management of a variety of governance frameworks, including data trusts, data commons, data exchanges and data collaboratives.

Why we’re interested

Brighthive is interesting as its knowledge graph platform is used for data collaboration with external organisations instead of internally. This allows organisations to easily work together and utilise selected data to maximise the potential of their chosen project. It seems that most of their projects are for public services and social impact programs but this could potentially be used within multinational organisations that different divisions have restrictions on with whom they can share their data with. Brighthive could also potentially be used in M&A due diligence as the organisations inspect the others data and see how best to integrate the databases together.


2017 founded, $7.5m raised, 10 – 25 employees, US-based

Client snapshot:

Deloitte, US Air Force

What do they do?

Fluree is a data management platform intended to facilitate secure data sharing and power data-driven insights. The company’s platform organizes blockchain-secured data in a scalable semantic graph database and establishes a foundational layer of trusted data for connected and intelligent data ecosystems, enabling users to make data completely tamper-proof.

Why we’re interested

Fluree uses blockchain technology to ensure the provenance and integrity of the data that its customers store on their knowledge graph. Using blockchain technology ensures that the data that is put into the knowledge graph is immutable meaning no one is able to change that stored information and its provenance is fully auditable and traceable through the ledger. This level of security may not be important for all organisations, but for regulated industries that need to maintain the integrity of their data, this would be an easy solution.


2014 founded, €5.5m raised, 25 – 50 employees, Germany-based,

Client snapshot:

Credit Suisse, Commerzbank, Deutsche Telekom, Merck & Co, UBS

What do they do?

Palturai is a global platform business addressing all B2B companies. Today companies lose millions p.a. not knowing their business partners‘ relationships. Inefficient sales lacking warm introductions, undetected fraud networks. Palturai provides the BusinessGraph: largest global network database covering connections between institutions & individuals. GraphIntelligence and AI enable customers to get insights about hidden networks within their customers either as SaaS or on-premise integrated with SAP and Salesforce.

Why we’re interested

Palturai knowledge graph platform has more of a focus on the financial services industry, as you can see from the customers. Through their software, financial services companies are able to get a full view of their clients and those customers greater network. Palturai is a great example of knowledge graph software that can visualise the entirety of an organisations client network. Allowing analysts or other interested parties in the organisation to get a birds-eye view of potential customer leads, risk or fraud issues, source data and much more.


2010 founded, $25.0m raised, 50 – 100 employees, Swiss-based

Client snapshot:

Accenture, Bayer, Cognizant, Daimler AG, Swisscom AG, Swiss Post

What do they do?

Starmind unlocks employees’ collective intelligence and expertise to supercharge productivity, innovation and career development. Patented artificial intelligence identifies subject matter experts across enterprises, accesses undocumented knowledge and generates employee skill profiles that are the foundation for upskilling, re-skilling and workforce planning. With customers in over 100 countries, Starmind has helped businesses worldwide gain over $1.4 billion as a result of productivity savings.

Why we’re interested

Starmind takes an human capital management angle to knowledge graphing by providing a single view of the the entirety of an organisations employee skills. If an organisation wanted to build a new team for a project they can easily consulate Starmind’s automatically created knowledge graph to find the right people for the job. Their platform also enables employees to find someone within the organisation who are experts in certain fields so they can get their questions answered efficiently and correctly.

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